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NEXT OF KIN TOURING EXHIBITION GOES DIGITAL

You can now explore the devastating impact of World War One on the people of Scotland on the go, with two new digital apps launched by National Museum’s Scotland’s innovative Next of Kin project.

The ‘Great War Stories across Scotland’ app shares a remarkable 43 personal and unique stories from Scottish families who endured life changing situations that seem unimaginable for most of us today.

The personal story of Seaman Stanley Cubiss which is included in The ‘Great War Stories across Scotland’ app.
The personal story of Seaman Stanley Cubiss which is included in The ‘Great War Stories across Scotland’ app.

The stories are told through touching and emotional keepsakes such as hand-written diary entries and letters between the front line and loved ones at home, whilst high-resolution photos of other artefacts such as engraved jewellery bring the first-hand accounts to life.

A gold engagement ring inscribed 'To Stanley from Flo- 6 March 2016' belonging to Ernest Stanley Cubiss (above).
A gold engagement ring inscribed ‘To Stanley from Flo- 6 March 2016′ belonging to Ernest Stanley Cubiss (above).

An interactive map highlights family connections between the stories and allows users to travel throughout Scotland to see the recurring issues faced by the nation during the war.

The second app, ‘Nurse Mellor’s Autograph Books’, offers a unique and intimate glimpse into the life of a World War One nurse, allowing users to access digitised autograph books of Florence Mellor who volunteered at war hospitals in Fife and Craiglockhart, Edinburgh.

Through 86 pages of satirical sketches and heartfelt poetry, Nurse Mellor’s three notebooks provide a deeply personal insight into the wartime wards.

An extract from Nurse Mellor's autograph book.
An extract from Nurse Mellor’s autograph book.

The Next of Kin touring exhibition, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund and Scottish Government, was created to tell the personal stories of families who suffered separation and loss throughout the war.

For many individuals, collecting and cherishing souvenirs as well as postcards, letters and photographs sent home was a way of remembering this remarkable period in their lives. For some, it was sadly the last contact they shared with loved ones who never returned home. Such items are collated and used to relate the individual tales of Scotland’s loved ones left behind.

Starting in 2015, the touring display has already been stationed at five museums across Scotland, with each venue incorporating a series of items that tell moving stories from the local area.

The exhibition is currently on display at Inverness Museum and Art Gallery until November 5, with a further three museums set to host the display and add their own unique exhibits until May 2017.

Further information and links to download the apps can be found at the Next of Kin website here.